CT Basement Systems Radon Blog by Matthew A. Bednarz V.P.

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON... (Clone)

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Mar, 15, 2016 @ 12:03 PM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON...

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Mon, Aug, 31, 2015 @ 11:08 AM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

News for Homebuyers Regarding Radon Resistant New Construction

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Fri, Jun, 19, 2015 @ 16:06 PM

From EPA.GOV

Home Buyers: Know What to Ask For

Basic Radon-Resistant New Construction Techniques for Your Home

Based on a rash of recent poorly engineered prefab radon system experiences, I felt it necessary to rehash an old post.  All of the techniques and materials described below are commonly used in home construction.  While the techniques may vary for different house foundations and building site requirements, the five basic features that should included in new construction to prevent radon from entering the home are:

cutaway of house with mitigation system
NOTE: If code allows; alternatives such as a soil gas collection mat can be a viable option.  
  1. Plastic Sheeting or Vapor Barrier / Retarder: Place heavy duty plastic sheeting (6 mil. polyethylene) or a vapor retarder on top of the gravel to prevent the soil gases from entering the house. The sheeting also keeps the concrete from clogging the gravel layer when the slab is poured.             

  2. A Vent Pipe: Run a 3-inch or 4-inch solid PVC pipe, vertically from the gravel layer (stubbed up when the slab is poured) through the house’s conditioned space and roof to safely vent radon and other soil gases outside above the house.  Whenever possible - 4" pipe is a better choice as it allows for up to double the volume of air to be removed out from under the slab as compared to 3".                                                        

  3. For very large footprints, multiple vertical stacks are recommended.  We did a project in a Greenwich estate that had 6 stacks. (Although serving a different purpose, this vent pipe is similar to the drain waste vent, DWV, installed by the plumber for the sanitary system.) This pipe should be labeled "Radon System."       

  4. Sealing and Caulking: Seal all openings, cracks, and crevices in the concrete foundation floor (including the slab perimeter; floor wall joint) and walls with polyurethane caulk to prevent radon and other soil gases from entering the home.                

  5. Junction Box:  An electrical outlet should be provided near the pipe location in the attic.  This is allows for easy fan connection in the event the system has to be activated to effectively reduce radon concentrations.

Some common mistakes made with radon resistant construction pipe installation are;
  • inaccessible attic locations (pipe located where no one can fit),
  • slab stubs located at opposite end of basement from ceiling stub (results in excessive pipe runs),  
  • multiple slab level layouts not being addressed.
Homes located in areas that have water wells should have a second or independent stack installed from the basement ceiling as close to the well tank as possible, to the attic floor.  In the event the water is found to have elevated radon levels, an aeration system will need to be installed.  This system requires a separate exhaust stack.
RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION HELP

 

Topics: radon resistant construction, radon mitigation, radon in air, radon mitigation system, radon testing, radon in air concentrations, indoor radon in air levels, Radon Air, radon mitigation fan, radon concentrations

RADON ACTION MONTH

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Jan, 20, 2015 @ 10:01 AM

 

 radon testing

January is RADON ACTION MONTH in the United States.  With the holiday season behind us, we're staring winter square in the face. It's a good time to think about testing your home for radon.  Even if you have a radon in air mitigation system, the EPA recommends follow up testing every two years.  There is no "safe" level of radon.  In fact, there's an associated risk of lung cancer with exposure to any level of radon.  The EPA's 4.0 pCi/l Action Level is a level at which to take "ACTION" to reduce radon concentrations and reduce exposure risk...it IS NOT a "safe level"!

describe the image

 Radon in air concentrations fluctuate in direct correlation with weather conditions.  Winter time is "worst case" scenario for radon testing due in large part to the "stack effect". 

 

stack effect RADON ACTION MONTH gives us an opportunity to think about radon exposure and the threat it presents to our families and loved ones...at a time of year when we are most likely to be exposed to the highest radon concentrations for the longest periods of time.  If the home has a private water well as its' water source...the water should also be tested for radon in water concentrations.

Many home owners have the misconception that one radon test below 4.0 pCi/l indicates a  "radon free" home.  This flawed thinking translates into countless cases of unintended exposure to elevated radon concentrations by unsuspecting home owners and their families.  Many of these victims of circumstance can trace their unrealized exposure dilemma back to the purchase of their home. " But when we bought the home - there was no radon" is a phrase that is all too commonly recited by disenchanted homeowners selling their home and having to mitigate elevated radon levels before they can close the sales transaction.

The largest percentage of homes mitigated for radon are a result of the home inspection process during a real estate transaction.  Paradoxically, the largest number of unsuspecting homeowners being exposed to elevated radon levels on a yearly basis are a result of the home sale / inspection process. Here's why...

 Home inspections are an integral component of the real estate transaction process. Radon testing (or a real estate radon screening measurement) is part of this process.  When a "for sale" home tests high for radon... most often it is mitigated before title is transfered.  When considering that the real estate market - in general - realizes maximum sales volume in spring and summer, many of these home inspections yield "low" or "lower" radon screening results simply because of the time of year the home is being tested (inspected - sold). 

Unfortunately, most homeowners never bother to follow up with a cold weather radon test. This oftentimes results in homeowners being exposed to elevated radon concentrations (albeit for a portion of the year) for as long as they own their home, because they have been lulled into a false sense of security by the one low result they got at the time of the original inspection / test.  

radon testing devices

Radon is a class 1 carcinogen...it is the number one source of lung cancer in non - smokers, is naturally occuring, is on the periodic table of elements, is found everywhere to some degree, is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, is easy to test for, is fixable...and most importantly - IS REAL!  It's RADON ACTION MONTH...  TAKE ACTION! - test your home today! 

 

 

certified radon mitigator and testor

Topics: radon, radon mitigation system, radon testing, radon in air concentrations, real estate screening measurements, radon action month