CT Basement Systems Radon Blog by Matthew A. Bednarz V.P.

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON... (Clone)

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Mar, 15, 2016 @ 12:03 PM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON...

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Mon, Aug, 31, 2015 @ 11:08 AM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

Private Water Wells - Real Estate Transactions

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Wed, Aug, 27, 2014 @ 12:08 PM

private water wells

 

We've experienced several consecutive quarters of expanded water quality testing and treatment system implementation for "exotic" well water contaminants for homes with private water wells. These "exotic" contaminants are not included in a standard potability analysis...otherwise known as the CT Basic Profile, which is why I refer to them as "exotic." Uranium, arsenic, volatile organic compounds (VOC), and waterborne radon are contaminants readily found in our New England private water wells.

From a home seller perspective; any of these contaminants uncovered at the 11th hour of negotiations can jeopardize an otherwise amicable transaction. From a home buyer perspective; the discovery of one or more of these issues can tarnish the image of what they otherwise perceived to be a clean, safe, place to call; "home."

A home owner with a private water well should test their water quality annually. Ground water is "ever changing" and contaminants such as the aforementioned exotics can creep into a private water well undetected. Regular water quality monitoring just makes sense for protection of everyone's health that uses the water in the home. This will also establish a history for the home owner so that when it is time to sell, it can be demonstrated to the buyer that the water quality was monitored regularly, and if problems were ever found; what steps (if any), were taken to rectify them. If nothing else - awareness of issues can prevent expensive last minute surprises!

A home buyer interested in buying a home with a private water well should not walk away from such a home merely because a problem has surfaced with water quality. Any quality issue can be rectified. Granted - some problems are more complex than others - but there's a solution for every one.

water treatment solutions

Through the years, I've heard a myriad of opinions and comments regarding well water vs. city water. One of my favorites; "We come from NYC...it has the best water in the world!" I often wonder if any of those people who've made those comments ever considered just how old some of the distribution systems are that deliver water throughout the city. Furthermore; every time I go to a restaurant that has municipal water...I can instantly smell the chlorine residual in the glass of water they bring to the table. Municipal water isn't all it's cracked up to be!

So what do you do if you're a Realtor listing or showing your buyers a home with a private water well? My recommendation is to make your clients aware of the facts. A standard potability analysis doesn't tell the whole story, there's an additional costs for these test, any problem is fixable...and let your client decide how to proceed.

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, private water well, well water quality, uranium

ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING FOR REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Fri, Jul, 25, 2014 @ 15:07 PM

 

 Environmental Testing

Environmental testing for real estate transactions can become a contentious issue if administered improperly.  The negative impact can be further exacerbated by an erroneous interpretation of results.  Comments made by disgruntled property owners such as; "we've lived in the home for years and we're still here!" serve no useful purpose, and prove nothing more than they've been blessed with good genes...it doesn't mean that radon, arsenic, or whatever environmental contaminant in question isn't harmful.  We do not offer abatement services for mold or asbestos, so this article will focus on our areas of expertise.  

  Radon in air, radon in water, general water quality (potability), and "exotic" contaminants such as uranium, arsenic, and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) in drinking water are just some of the environmental issues that can turn an otherwise amicable property sale into a contentious transaction.  Overall property values will be negatively impacted if these problems are severe enough...not to mention the potential health ramifications to the home's occupants if left unchecked.  Mold & asbestos are examples of other environmental hazards lurking in homes.  

The statement: "Timing is everything" is true for many situations we encounter in everyday life.  This is also true when talking about environmental testing for real estate transactions.  As an example; Climatic conditions prior to - and during an airborne radon test can have a dramatic affect on the test results.  A thunderstorm with high winds will create a substantial spike in airborne radon concentrations.  A clear, calm, mild stretch of weather will yield the lowest possible results.  Winter conditions will yield higher airborne radon concentrations vs. summer like weather due to the "stack effect".

stack effect

The impact to well water quality from climatic conditions is less predictable.  Sometimes a water well can demonstrate an almost instant "change" from a passing a rainstorm...or climatic "event" (ie; pH drops down).  Other times it may take weeks or months for changes - if any - to occur.  Regardless of any climatic events...ground water is "ever changing", and therefore should be tested on a regular consistent basis.  Geologic shifts, extended periods of rain...or lack thereof, can influence what's happening down at the aquifier level.

 There are no filters or control valves down in the ground that allow only water of a certain quality to enter your well.  The well pump draws water in from the surrounding rock strata & pushes it up and into to your home. If, before getting drawn into the pump, the water flows through an arsenic, uranium, or radon bearing source, the more of a chance it will have an elevated presence of that contaminant.

 

Environmental testing for real estate transactions should also be testing that a homeowner does periodically throughout their residency in that home...not just at time of purchase.  Just like you maintain your furnace, kitchen appliances, or water conditioning equipment; a regular check on environmental hazards in the home is just another sensible "chore" a homeowner should undertake periodically. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: radon in water, radon in air, arsenic, potability, well water, water quality

ARSENIC IN WELL WATER

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Wed, Feb, 13, 2013 @ 13:02 PM

 

 

arsenic in well water

Arsenic in well water has recently become a hot topic for some lower Fairfield County towns such as Weston, Wilton, and Redding.  The discovery of arsenic - even at trace levels - can be unsettling.  In reality; any private well in CT (or the world for that matter!) is susceptible to arsenic contamination.  Arsenic is a semi - metallic, naturally occurring element and is colorless, odorless and tasteless when dissolved in water.  

arsenic potential map of CT

 Arsenic in well water most often occurs as a result of the erosion or weathering of arsenic rich minerals.  However, there are instances of groundwater contamination due to human activities such as mining and pesticide / herbicide application. 

The original maximum contaminant level (MCL) of .050 mg/l was first established because prior to 1975, .050 mg/l was the lowest level of detection for arsenic (LLD) possible.  Testing capabilities have since improved and in 2000 the president signed Public Law 106-337 to issue a deadline for lowering the arsenic MCL.  The final mandate took effect January 23, 2006 at .010 mg/l.

Acute arsenic poisoning (exposure to higher concentrations over a short time frame) typically results in nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pains (much akin to food poisoning).  Left untreated - it can be fatal.  Chronic arsenic poisoning (continual exposure to low concentrations over a long period of time) symptoms are less dramatic.  With sufficient duration of exposure; the results can be just as lethal.  Arsenic poisoning has been linked to bladder, skin, liver, and lung cancers as well as skin lesions and ulcers.  Visit; www.insmalldoses.org to learn more about arsenic in well water and the long term affects of exposure to even low concentrations of arsenic.

Removal options for arsenic in well water include ion exchange, reverse osmosis, coagulation / filtration, and arsenic - selective adsorbent medias or resins.  Arsenic in well water is most commonly present in two main forms (species); arsenite (As III) and arsenate (As V).  When considering removal options for arsenic in well water...it is important to verify how much arsenite (As III) and arsenate (As V) are present.  Arsenite (As III) is considerably harder to remove, however, it is not uncommon to find both species present simultaneously in the same water supply. 

periodic table with arsenic 

Having a clear picture of overall water quality is essential because the presence of other contaminants can negatively impact the performance of the various arsenic removal technologies.  Note that arsenic (AS) is positioned directly under phosphorous (P) on the Periodic Table of Elements.  Arsenic and phosphorous are in the same chemical family.  This close relationship lends itself to phosphates competing with arsenic for space on removal medias. 

 Water chemistry is critical to effective arsenic removal from well water.  Start with a basic arsenic and potability test.  If there is an arsenic presence;the next step is an arsenic speciation test that also checks silica, vanadium, and phosphates.  After considering the jobsite conditions, size and demand of the home; a choice of appropriate technology can be made.  Follow up testing is another crucial component of an effective arsenic removal and monitoring program.

CONTACT US TO TEST YOUR WATER QUALITY 

Certified Water Specialist

 

 

   

 

 

Topics: arsenic poisoning, arsenic removal from well water, arsenic, arsenic in well water