CT Basement Systems Radon Blog by Matthew A. Bednarz V.P.

URANIUM IN WELL WATER

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Fri, Oct, 06, 2017 @ 13:10 PM

uranium in well water

Uranium in well water has received much attention recently as a result of the State of CT recommending all private water well owners to test their water for uranium and arsenic http://1.usa.gov/WBDYmi (in addition to the common general water quality parameters).  Uranium (U) is naturally occurring in the earth's crust, and can dissolve into water if that water source is exposed to uranium bearing rock strata.  There is a significantly greater probability of elevated uranium in well water rather than in surface water supplies.

uranium concentrations[1]

High levels of uranium in well water may increase the risk of cancer and kidney damage.  The EPA has established 30 ppb as a maximum contaminant level (MCL) with a maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) of zero.  The MCL was established on the basis of the heavy metal toxicity of uranium - not radioactivity.  It is this toxicity that is the primary health concern - not radioactivity when assessing health concerns over the ingestion of uranium in well water.  Uranium decreases the kidneys' ability to remove impurities from blood.  This condition is reversible if uranium consumption is eliminated.  However; it is the concern over radioactivity that must be contemplated when implementing a removal strategy. 

uranium

 Treatment systems that absorb or collect uranium with no backwash or regenerating capability will eventually reach a saturation point for radioactivity requiring special permitting for disposal of spent filter media.  Therefore, the most prudent approach for Point of Entry (POE) uranium in water removal is anion exchange.

While appearing quite similar to a water softener, (the outward appearance of both systems are identical) the anion resin functions differently from negatively charged cation (softening) resin.  Rather than removing positively charged ions out of the water, as is the case with water softener (cation) resin, anion resins have a positive charge and remove negatively charged ions (such as uranium and arsenic).  When an anion system regenerates, it uses the chloride portion of sodium chloride rather than the sodium portion that the cation resin does. 

The State of CT views anion exchange systems as a viable treatment option provided these systems discharge any water from the regeneration process into a dedicated sub surface drainage system (drywell).  Anion exchange is the most viable cost effective, whole house treatment solution for uranium in well water removal.

sub surface drainage 2017.jpg

A combination unit (referred to as a "mixed bed" softener) can also be installed if there is both hardness & uranium present in the same water supply.  This is an especially useful tool when floor space is at a premium.  The cation & anion resins are simply mixed within the same vessel.  This is a practical approach when applied to water with hardness levels up to 7 gpg.  

water softener cut away view resized 600

Reverse osmosis (RO) is the preferred point of use (POU) treatment to remove uranium in well water.  RO is a process where water is squeezed under pressure, through a semi - permeable membrane, filtering out the majority of dissolved solids, leaving just water that is free of dissolved solids for consumption. 

point of use reverse osmosis

The disadvantages to this option are; limited / slow production capacities, and the issue of having to draw water from a specific tap to get water that is treated...all other points of use in the home are not treated.  While installing separate POU RO systems can be a solution...it isn't practicle...and is oftentimes not feasible to accomplish.

Whole house reverse osmosis (point of entry POE) is an alternative to anion exchange and POU RO, but it can be cost prohibitive for many homeowners from both an install and maintenance perspective.  In order to have enough available water for demand, a large storage reservoir with repressurization is required.  Whole house reverse osmosis systems also "waste" large volumes of water to drain while processing treated water.

 

whole house reverse osmosis

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

uranium in well water removal specialist

   

Topics: uranium in well water, water softener, reverse osmosis, mixed bed water softener, anion exchange

CT WELLS - DROUGHT CONDITIONS & PRIVATE WATER WELLS

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Oct, 11, 2016 @ 10:10 AM

 well_pump_systems_for_web_-_copy.jpg

Drought_no_swimming.jpg

Unless you've been away from CT on vacation for a very long time, you're probably aware of the drought conditions we are facing here in CT.  Drive by a local reservoir, river or stream and you'll readily see signs that we're definitely experiencing a deficit in rain fall.

 

 

Matt_with_hoist.jpg

 

 

 What oftentimes gets overlooked is the affect climatic conditions have on  our private water well systems...particularly rainfall deficits.  While up to  97% of the world's fresh water supply is sub surface, this doesn't mean that  well pumps are drawing from an infinite source.  Wells are drilled down until  there are signs of enough water filling the bore hole.  If the "yield" (flow of  water into the well) is poor, the driller keeps drilling down until a marked  improvement is noted.  The downside to consider is; the deeper you go -  the bigger the equipment needed to deliver the water up into the home to  point of use.  Bigger = more $$$.

 

 

 

Drought_pic_tied_faucet.jpg We're currently getting more and more calls  from home owners with wells regarding  problems with water quality, treatment  system issues, and even problems with  appliances that utilize water.  The sad reality  is; aside from conserving water as best you  can, there's not much you can do about the availability of water in the ground for use. 

With respect to water conservation, things like doing full loads of laundry, running the dishwasher with a full load of dishware, shortening shower times...and cutting back or altogether eliminating irrigation are the hallmarks of water conservation for the private water well owner.  

The first tell tale signs of a water supply issue are typically the loss of water pressure or simply no water at the taps.  This oftentimes occurs first thing in the morning when the active modern day family is getting ready for the day's activities. In many cases, the well recovers by evening when everyone returns home, which encourages the homeowner to shrug it off as an "anomaly" or something else.  Repeated incidences of running out of water or pressure drops that start to happen more frequently indicate an acute problem turning chronic.

Drought_Pic_Well_cap.jpg

Drought_Pic_What_to_do.jpg

 

What's a home owner to do with a private water well during drought conditions?  Aside from the aforementioned water conservation measures, there are things that can be done to improve water supply issues. 

In - ground options:

Hydrofracking: This is a process where high pressure water is pumped into the well head.  The goal is for the pressure to open up & clear out the cracks in the bedrock into which the well is drilled.  The hope here is that these newly formed fissures and newly cleaned out existing ones will yield more water supplied to the well.  While this can be a successful process, there are no guaranties of any level of success.

Drill a new well: Drilling a new well is the most expensive option which also carries no guarantee of success unless you have a bottomless wallet.  In that case, the driller just keeps drilling until an adequate supply is tapped.  Aside from the cost of "drilling to China"; there is now that added expense of installing a pumping system robust enough to deliver the water to the surface...not to mention increased operational expense of bigger motors etc.Well_drilling_rig.jpg

In - house options:

PumpTec.jpg A "pump tec" can be installed to  monitor pump operation and  temporarily shut down the well  pump if a lack of water is detected.   While this doesn't solve the water  supply issue, the pump tec will at  least help protect the well pump  from burning out.  Most any well  system can benefit from the protection of a pump tec device.  Newer sub drive pump systems have a pump tec type feature built into the control panel.  The pump tec can be installed most often for a few hundred dollars, making it the most cost effective step to implement in dealing with wells affected by drought conditions.

 

Ganged_up_pressure_tanks.jpg Multiple pressure tanks:  Ganging up multiple  pressure tanks together will increase storage  capacity...marginally. A common misconception  regarding pressure tanks is that they fill up completely  with water.  The reality; pressure tanks - when full - are  only filled roughly one third the total volume of the tank.    As an example; the largest standard residential pressure  tank (WX 350 - 26" x 61" tall with a total volume of 119  gallons) holds 35 gallons when operating at a 40/60 psi  pressure cycle.  Ganging up pressure tanks should be  viewed as a strategy for increasing pump cycle time - not  to appreciably increase storage capacity.

 

 

 

 

 

Static_Tank_in_crawl_space-1.jpgStatic Storage:  Storing water at atmospheric pressure in large volumes is probably the most reliable / cost effective approach to dealing with water production issues from your well.  Water is pumped from the well, into tank(s) located in the basement.  When water is called for use, a pump sends water to that usage point.  If the well is stressed and can't produce a lot of water at once, the water can be added gradually to the static storage.  Once a reservoir has been developed, the well will have more time to "recover" because the water used in the home will be coming from the static system...not directly out of the ground.  This too doesn't solve the lack of available sub surface water, but it does make the situation more manageable at a fraction of the cost of some other options.

  Static_Storage_scematic.jpg

 Hub_Spot_Signature_2016.jpg

Contact us to optimize your water well performance

Topics: submersible well pump, well pump, aquifier, private water well system, water well system, ground water, well tank, water well, static storage systems, pressure tanks, storage tanks, well tanks, poor recovery rate

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON... (Clone)

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Mar, 15, 2016 @ 12:03 PM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

Sub-Surface Drainage

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Dec, 15, 2015 @ 10:12 AM

 Dry_well_progression.jpg


Dedicated sub - surface drainage systems are required by the State of CT for any water conditioning system that has a back wash or regeneration function.  The waste water from the back wash or regeneration process must be connected to this system, rather than simply routed to the building's exterior, or to the septic system.  The physical characteristics of the particular property the system is to be installed in will impact the final cost and layout.  


sub_surface_drainage_2015.jpg

 

 



If your water treatment system backwash is currently not draining to a dedicated sub surface drainage system, call us for a no obligation survey of your property to assess the installation possibilities.

 Contact us for a no obligation  survey to determine  installation options!



 2015_signature1.jpg

ARSENIC,HARDNESS, IRON, MANGANESE, URANIUM,RADON...

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Mon, Aug, 31, 2015 @ 11:08 AM

 blog header

I typically try to focus our blog topics on content that can help people discern what to do when dealing with radon or water quality issues.  If you, or someone you know, is contemplating buying a home with water quality or radon issues...we can help.

My goal of this post is to give perspective of scale to the the problems some people face when dealing with radon and water quality issues...and hopefully make those of us who feel they have an insurmountable situation - better.

Radon in Air concentrations:  We successfully mitigated a home in Glastonbury, CT (new construction), with an indoor airborne radon concentration of 900 pCi/l

Radon in Water: We successfully mitigated a home in Ridgefield, CT with a waterborne radon concentration that spiked as high as 1.7 million pCi/l.

Contact us for Radon Testing  in Air & Water

Arsenic: We installed an absorbtive media treatment system to succesfully remove an arsenic level of 24 ug/l from a private well in Weston.

Bacteria: We've installed numerous Ultra Violet Light sterilization systems for E-coli and coliform bacteria problems throughout CT and Westchester County NY.

Coliform bacteria 

Chlorides: We installed a whole house reverse osmosis system to successfully remove a chloride level of 720 mg/l in a Stamford, CT home.

Hardness: We've installed water softeners to remove hardness concentrations as high as 48 grains per gallon.

Hard water comparison

Iron in water: We've installed numerous iron filtration systems throughout CT to remove iron concentrations as high as 26 mg/l.

Contact us about  Iron Removal

Manganese in well water: We've installed oxidation / filtration systems to remove manganese concentrations as high as 7.5 mg/l

Nitrate: We've installed reverse osmosis systems to remove nitrate levels as high as 16 mg/l

pH: We've adjusted low pH water from as low as 4.6 to neutral (7.0) with a chemical injection system.

ph chart

Tannins: While not commonly tested; tannins can be difficult to remove from water...we've seen levels as high as 5 mg/l...and successfully lowered them.

Uranium: We have successfully removed uranium concentrations as high as 1,600 ug/l.

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

The point of referencing the aforementioned high concentration contaminant levels that we've fixed is not for bragging rights.  It's purpose is to illustrate that treatment options exists for any level of contaminant, no matter how severe.

Contaminant levels in both air and water can, and do, fluctuate.  I've seen many homeowners lulled into having a false sense of security because at some point, they performed one test that had favorable results, and never tested again...only to find out at some point that there is a problem. 

Drilling a new well, not buying a dream home, moving to another house, not occupying certain areas of a home, are all alternatives that will avoid having to deal with these situations.  But there's a better option.  We have the ability to solve most any radon or water quality issue to keep you and your family safe and protected in the home that you love.

 cozy home

 

Topics: radon in water, arsenic, hardness, radon in air concentrations, manganese in well water, iron in water

News for Homebuyers Regarding Radon Resistant New Construction

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Fri, Jun, 19, 2015 @ 16:06 PM

From EPA.GOV

Home Buyers: Know What to Ask For

Basic Radon-Resistant New Construction Techniques for Your Home

Based on a rash of recent poorly engineered prefab radon system experiences, I felt it necessary to rehash an old post.  All of the techniques and materials described below are commonly used in home construction.  While the techniques may vary for different house foundations and building site requirements, the five basic features that should included in new construction to prevent radon from entering the home are:

cutaway of house with mitigation system
NOTE: If code allows; alternatives such as a soil gas collection mat can be a viable option.  
  1. Plastic Sheeting or Vapor Barrier / Retarder: Place heavy duty plastic sheeting (6 mil. polyethylene) or a vapor retarder on top of the gravel to prevent the soil gases from entering the house. The sheeting also keeps the concrete from clogging the gravel layer when the slab is poured.             

  2. A Vent Pipe: Run a 3-inch or 4-inch solid PVC pipe, vertically from the gravel layer (stubbed up when the slab is poured) through the house’s conditioned space and roof to safely vent radon and other soil gases outside above the house.  Whenever possible - 4" pipe is a better choice as it allows for up to double the volume of air to be removed out from under the slab as compared to 3".                                                        

  3. For very large footprints, multiple vertical stacks are recommended.  We did a project in a Greenwich estate that had 6 stacks. (Although serving a different purpose, this vent pipe is similar to the drain waste vent, DWV, installed by the plumber for the sanitary system.) This pipe should be labeled "Radon System."       

  4. Sealing and Caulking: Seal all openings, cracks, and crevices in the concrete foundation floor (including the slab perimeter; floor wall joint) and walls with polyurethane caulk to prevent radon and other soil gases from entering the home.                

  5. Junction Box:  An electrical outlet should be provided near the pipe location in the attic.  This is allows for easy fan connection in the event the system has to be activated to effectively reduce radon concentrations.

Some common mistakes made with radon resistant construction pipe installation are;
  • inaccessible attic locations (pipe located where no one can fit),
  • slab stubs located at opposite end of basement from ceiling stub (results in excessive pipe runs),  
  • multiple slab level layouts not being addressed.
Homes located in areas that have water wells should have a second or independent stack installed from the basement ceiling as close to the well tank as possible, to the attic floor.  In the event the water is found to have elevated radon levels, an aeration system will need to be installed.  This system requires a separate exhaust stack.
RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION HELP

 

Topics: radon resistant construction, radon mitigation, radon in air, radon mitigation system, radon testing, radon in air concentrations, indoor radon in air levels, Radon Air, radon mitigation fan, radon concentrations

URANIUM IN WELL WATER

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Fri, Jun, 12, 2015 @ 09:06 AM

uranium in well water

Uranium in well water has received much attention recently as a result of the State of CT recommending all private water well owners to test their water for uranium and arsenic http://1.usa.gov/WBDYmi (in addition to the common general water quality parameters).  Uranium (U) is naturally occurring in the earth's crust, and can dissolve into water if that water source is exposed to uranium bearing rock strata.  There is a significantly greater probability of elevated uranium in well water rather than in surface water supplies.

uranium concentrations[1]

High levels of uranium in well water may increase the risk of cancer and kidney damage.  The EPA has established 30 ppb as a maximum contaminant level (MCL) with a maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) of zero.  The MCL was established on the basis of the heavy metal toxicity of uranium - not radioactivity.  It is this toxicity that is the primary health concern - not radioactivity when assessing health concerns over the ingestion of uranium in well water.  Uranium decreases the kidneys' ability to remove impurities from blood.  This condition is reversible if uranium consumption is eliminated.  However; it is the concern over radioactivity that must be contemplated when implementing a removal strategy. 

uranium

 Treatment systems that absorb or collect uranium with no backwash or regenerating capability will eventually reach a saturation point for radioactivity requiring special permitting for disposal of spent filter media.  Therefore, the most prudent approach for Point of Entry (POE) uranium in water removal is anion exchange.

While appearing quite similar to a water softener, (the outward appearance of both systems are identical) the anion resin functions differently from negatively charged cation (softening) resin.  Rather than removing positively charged ions out of the water, as is the case with water softener (cation) resin, anion resins have a positive charge and remove negatively charged ions (such as uranium and arsenic).  When an anion system regenerates, it uses the chloride portion of sodium chloride rather than the sodium portion that the cation resin does. 

The State of CT views anion exchange systems as a viable treatment option provided these systems discharge any water from the regeneration process into a dedicated sub surface drainage system (drywell).  Anion exchange is the most viable cost effective, whole house treatment solution for uranium in well water removal.

A combination unit (referred to as a "mixed bed" softener) can also be installed if there is both hardness & uranium present in the same water supply.  This is an especially useful tool when floor space is at a premium.  The cation & anion resins are simply mixed within the same vessel.  This is a practical approach when applied to water with hardness levels up to 7 gpg.  

water softener cut away view resized 600

Reverse osmosis (RO) is the preferred point of use (POU) treatment to remove uranium in well water.  RO is a process where water is squeezed under pressure, through a semi - permeable membrane, filtering out the majority of dissolved solids, leaving just water that is free of dissolved solids for consumption. 

point of use reverse osmosis

The disadvantages to this option are; limited / slow production capacities, and the issue of having to draw water from a specific tap to get water that is treated...all other points of use in the home are not treated.  While installing separate POU RO systems can be a solution...it isn't practicle...and is oftentimes not feasible to accomplish.

Whole house reverse osmosis (point of entry POE) is an alternative to anion exchange and POU RO, but it can be cost prohibitive for many homeowners from both an install and maintenance perspective.  In order to have enough available water for demand, a large storage reservoir with repressurization is required.  Whole house reverse osmosis systems also "waste" large volumes of water to drain while processing treated water.

 

whole house reverse osmosis

Click Here to contact us for  Uranium Testing Today!

uranium in well water removal specialist

   

Topics: uranium in well water, water softener, reverse osmosis, mixed bed water softener, anion exchange

RADON ACTION MONTH

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Tue, Jan, 20, 2015 @ 10:01 AM

 

 radon testing

January is RADON ACTION MONTH in the United States.  With the holiday season behind us, we're staring winter square in the face. It's a good time to think about testing your home for radon.  Even if you have a radon in air mitigation system, the EPA recommends follow up testing every two years.  There is no "safe" level of radon.  In fact, there's an associated risk of lung cancer with exposure to any level of radon.  The EPA's 4.0 pCi/l Action Level is a level at which to take "ACTION" to reduce radon concentrations and reduce exposure risk...it IS NOT a "safe level"!

describe the image

 Radon in air concentrations fluctuate in direct correlation with weather conditions.  Winter time is "worst case" scenario for radon testing due in large part to the "stack effect". 

 

stack effect RADON ACTION MONTH gives us an opportunity to think about radon exposure and the threat it presents to our families and loved ones...at a time of year when we are most likely to be exposed to the highest radon concentrations for the longest periods of time.  If the home has a private water well as its' water source...the water should also be tested for radon in water concentrations.

Many home owners have the misconception that one radon test below 4.0 pCi/l indicates a  "radon free" home.  This flawed thinking translates into countless cases of unintended exposure to elevated radon concentrations by unsuspecting home owners and their families.  Many of these victims of circumstance can trace their unrealized exposure dilemma back to the purchase of their home. " But when we bought the home - there was no radon" is a phrase that is all too commonly recited by disenchanted homeowners selling their home and having to mitigate elevated radon levels before they can close the sales transaction.

The largest percentage of homes mitigated for radon are a result of the home inspection process during a real estate transaction.  Paradoxically, the largest number of unsuspecting homeowners being exposed to elevated radon levels on a yearly basis are a result of the home sale / inspection process. Here's why...

 Home inspections are an integral component of the real estate transaction process. Radon testing (or a real estate radon screening measurement) is part of this process.  When a "for sale" home tests high for radon... most often it is mitigated before title is transfered.  When considering that the real estate market - in general - realizes maximum sales volume in spring and summer, many of these home inspections yield "low" or "lower" radon screening results simply because of the time of year the home is being tested (inspected - sold). 

Unfortunately, most homeowners never bother to follow up with a cold weather radon test. This oftentimes results in homeowners being exposed to elevated radon concentrations (albeit for a portion of the year) for as long as they own their home, because they have been lulled into a false sense of security by the one low result they got at the time of the original inspection / test.  

radon testing devices

Radon is a class 1 carcinogen...it is the number one source of lung cancer in non - smokers, is naturally occuring, is on the periodic table of elements, is found everywhere to some degree, is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, is easy to test for, is fixable...and most importantly - IS REAL!  It's RADON ACTION MONTH...  TAKE ACTION! - test your home today! 

 

 

certified radon mitigator and testor

Topics: radon, radon mitigation system, radon testing, radon in air concentrations, real estate screening measurements, radon action month

Manganese in well water

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Thu, Dec, 04, 2014 @ 11:12 AM
remove manganese from well water
Manganese in well water is oftentimes mistaken for iron.  It is not uncommon to find an elevated level of manganese in conjunction with an objectionable level of iron in the same water supply.  Although possible, it is not common to find an elevated level of manganese by itself in a private well water supply.
manganese and iron out of faucet resized 600
While iron will leave yellow to reddish and brown stains on fixtures; manganese in well water will typically leave a brown to black stain on fixtures.  Manganese in water can also emit a foul smell.  When present in levels exceeding the .05 mg/l limit, manganese can make the water unpalateable.
Manganese is most often found in a "dissolved" state (manganous), which is clear water manganese.  When oxidation is added via chemical or physical means; the water turns color and the oxidized manganese is (manganic). 
HAVE HIGH LEVELS OF MANGANESE?? WE CAN HELP!!
Manganese and iron are the two "stainers" that we typically find in New England well water.  Both have positive charges and are heavy metals. Manganese and iron are governed by EPA secondary water quality standards...which means the standards are based on aesthetic impact and are not health related.  Both leave stains and both can induce an odor in the water supply they're present in.  Manganese removal from water is accomplished by much of the same processess utilized to remove iron from water.
manganese in drinking water
Despite the many similarities between iron and manganese; manganese in well water can be more difficult to remove when compared with iron.  It takes significantly less manganese (.05 mg/l) presence in a water supply to cause problems with staining of fixtures and odor in comparison to iron (.3 mg/l).
 Manganese removal typically requires a significantly higher pH to be efficiently precipitated out of water as compared to iron.  This can potentially translate into more complicated or elaborate treatment schemes such as a
chlorination / filtration system. 
Chlorination Filtration System resized 600
Yet; as is the case with much of water treatment, it depends on the particular water well source to be treated. When the water is acidic, water softeners can prove to be a viable treatment option for manganese since it (manganese) carries a positive charge similar to typical hardness ions in well water.  However; more often than not; effective manganese removal will usually involve some form of oxidation (chemical or physical), followed
 by filtration.  Chemical oxidation is usually done with chlorine or hydrogen peroxide injection.  Physical oxidation is done with air and is oftentimes      accompanied with some form of agitation.
aerator precipitator system resized 600manganese clogged filters resized 600
It is critical to ensure maganese in water levels are within acceptable limits when considering the installation of a reverse osmosis system, ultra violet light, or any other final stage "polisher" filter product.  This is because excess amounts of manganese will quickly foul membranes and carbon filters, or coat UV quartz tubes, requiring them to be replaced prematurely...which increases overall cost per gallon of treated water produced. 



Topics: manganese removal, manganese in well water, brown to black stain

Radon Action Week

Posted by Matthew Bednarz on Thu, Oct, 23, 2014 @ 07:10 AM

It's Radon Action Week!!....

describe the image

Topics: Radon Air